Erp Implementation Plan: Methodology And Processes


Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solutions are designed to support every organization in almost every aspect of business operations by centralizing data and automating it. These platforms control internal processes, facilitating business planning for finance, suppliers, materials, goods, services, and customer service. Knowing the ERP implementation methodology gives you more visibility into how the overall project is carried out.

The central feature of all ERP software is a shared database, which supports multiple functions used by different business units. In practice, this means that employees from different departments such as accounting, sales, and human resources (to name a few) can rely on the same information coming from the same source to solve one by one all their business process needs on a day-to-day basis.

In this article, in addition to addressing the topic of the ERP system, we are going to talk about the implementation process of this platform, what are the points to take into consideration in this process and solve the doubt if it is an expensive process or not.

WHAT IS THE ERP SOFTWARE IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS?

Every ERP implementation is different so there is no standard template. In general, the implementation process has basic similarities from case to case.

A standard ERP implementation strategy includes similar phases from purchasing the solution to installing licenses or software, from transferring financial data to assigning business processes and from accessing the system for each department to the user group or business function.

PHASES OF THE ERP SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS

As mentioned above, the ERP implementation methodology can be simple or complex depending on factors such as the size of the organization, the complexity of the project or whether an on-premise or on-cloud solution is to be implemented.

On-premises solutions have the additional steps of including hardware infrastructure installations as well as the addition of staff to maintain the infrastructure. Since all support activities such as configuration hosting and installation are handled in-house, these added phases can change and often lengthen the deployment. And thus make it more costly.

However cloud ERP deployments can skip some of the traditional steps involved in an on-premises deployment. The solution provider manages the infrastructure, allowing companies to focus on data migration, process changes and preparing the people who will operate the platform. The additional steps of hosting, server issues and server maintenance are usually handled by the ERP vendor. And in the end, the investment, which may be considerable at the beginning, has a really attractive return in time and form.

PHASE ONE: PUT TOGETHER A PROJECT TEAM

The project team is ultimately responsible for the overall health of the implementation project, overseeing the day-to-day initiatives and timelines that guide members through their ERP software implementation checklist.

Members of this task force will be coached on the technical and operational issues of the platform by vendor and organizational project managers, as well as analysts, developers, key users and engineers. Each member fulfills independent and tactical roles focused on performing configuration, installation, testing and migration tasks.

PHASE TWO: CREATE THE IMPLEMENTATION BUDGET

The success or failure of an implementation project can depend on setting a realistic budget, and the main reason companies go over budget is because they expand the scope of the ERP project. ERP software implementation budgets can be broken down into three categories: technical costs, personnel costs and data migration costs.

Technical costs include software, licenses and hardware primarily. Personnel costs include internal and external personnel-related costs, which include education and training costs. ERP data migration costs will include areas such as data extraction from the legacy system and start-up costs, as well as clean data transfer to the new ERP solution.

PHASE THREE: DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

During the design and development phase of an ERP implementation plan, the customer and vendor define procedures and document new processes for how the new ERP solution will manage data. Once the processes are defined, they develop a database framework that meets those new requirements and procedures.

PHASE FOUR: DATA MIGRATION

Data migration is crucial to the success of the implementation, but transferring data from one system to another can be cumbersome and present unforeseen obstacles. The goal is to move clean data that has been identified and cleansed to the appropriate location in the new system.

PHASE FIVE: TRAINING

To reap the full benefits of an ERP system, the company must ensure that end users understand how it operates to take advantage of the new system. Training must be comprehensive and available to employees through a combination of online learning opportunities.


PHASE SIX: TESTING PERIOD

After implementation, administrators go through a testing phase with the vendor to ensure that the systems and data are working as expected. This is also an opportunity to troubleshoot any problems or establish remedies for areas that are not up to par or not working as they should. Developers, engineers and other users on the project team test connections and validate data migrations, fine-tuning the settings so that the ERP solution works optimally before the final data transfer and go-live date.

PHASE SEVEN: GO LIVE

It's the big moment: The systems have been developed, most of the data has been transferred, product training and onboarding activities have taken place, and testing is complete. But a few steps remain. Transaction-based data-inventory, purchase orders, purchase orders, accounts receivable, and balances-is dynamic and changes frequently, so you must transfer it at the last minute to maintain accuracy. Once you've set everything up, set the input data in place and the system is ready for use!

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